Feasibility study & Master planning

The feasibility study is the first step of the amusement park design process.
This process provides for project site, concept review, supportable market estimating, design day criteria, attendance projections, revenue forecasting and investment level.
Next step which is based on the results of the Feasibility Analysis, allows our design team to proceed with the preparation of a Comprehensive Land Use and Masterplan.
Master planning is the art of environment, developing a flawless union between story and setting.
In this phase of work, there are a number of steps to be taken culminating in a presentation package.
• Analysis and Research
• Program Development
• Concept/ Theme Development
• Master Plan Development
• Preliminary Economic Analysis
• Presentation Package/Deliverables

Feasibility Analysis:
The development process generally begins with a site visit and initial meeting to discuss the client's vision for the new leisure attraction. Conceptually, the design effort begins with a blank page.
Feasibility Analysis are the “roadmap” for the project. This analysis provides for project site, concept review, supportable market estimating, design day criteria, attendance projections, revenue forecasting and net warranted investment.
The results of this study define the financial and design planning parameters for a project.
This is the first and most important step to ensure the success of any leisure attraction development.

Next step which is based on the results of the Feasibility Analysis, allows our design team to proceed with the preparation of a Comprehensive Land Use and Masterplan.
In this phase, we provide all finalized programs to include support services for guests and employees, as well as rides and attractions selections.

Masterplan Programming:
The project’s goals and scope are developed and documented. The project team is chosen and their tasks are delineated. This process delivers a set of clear goals that define the size, financial parameters, schedule milestones, and target audience. In addition, the creation of physical layout, site utilization, planning and development strategies help to establish the project scope.
Land Use Plan often starts with a "bubble diagram" that applies the feasibility study's physical recommendations to the client's site. This initial land use plan becomes more refined and detailed as it adapts to the particular needs of the concept and site.

 
An amusement park or "theme park" typically has five to seven distinctively themed areas under a broad overall theme.
After establishing the themed areas, individual components are distributed within each area. Major rides and shows are typically placed at the edges in order to attract guests throughout the park. This approach helps maximize overall holding capacity and crowd flow. The main shops are generally placed near the exit for convenience.
Based on typical guest behavior and pedestrian planning standards, a visitor circulation plan can also be prepared to ensure smooth movement throughout the amusement park. This enhances guest comfort and prevents bottlenecks.

Illustrated Master Plan
Functional needs are combined with visual theming in an illustrated master plan. As shown, structures are often color-coded by type in order to aid optimum distribution and placement.

Aerial Perspective
Although functional aspects are critical for operational success, a new amusement park also needs to be visually appealing and understandable to non-professional individuals involved with the project. An effective way of showcasing an amusement park is with an aerial perspective, often from a "bird's-eye" perspective. The aerial perspective below is for the "Kids Zone" of same amusement park as the illustrated part master plan above.

Theming development:
As the overall design vision for the project takes form, more detailed views of smaller parts of the project (such as an individual themed area) can also be prepared. Below is an example of a close-up rendering.

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